Smartphone of bondage or freedom?

Who’s the dominatrix of your family of tech gadgets - you, your smartphone, partner, or kids.

Once smart phones attain artificial intelligence can we expect ours to invite us to their annual awards night?

To adore us as our century’s Henry Ford having given Mistress Smart Phone, joys of mobility Henry Ford’s Model T couldn’t match?

Steve Jobs’ avatar will likely get the Mistress’s nod and deny us 15-seconds of You-Tube immortality.

Phone winsThat’s one 60th of 15-minutes Andy Warhol promised us before bequeathing his afterglow to his pop-art soup tin and visages of a fellow blond siren, deceased but never forgotten.

Henry Ford drove the Model T’s price down near 200 per cent in 10 years post-launch to US$400 giving America affordable personal mobility. Jobs doubled phone and airtime spend in 2007, but made data mobile on a global scale we yet fully comprehend.

Ford’s horse power kick-started oil tycoons, Middle East imperialism and America’s rise to super-power status.  Jobs is his only real challenger for the title of Chief Catalyst in mass change in human behavior in 500 years.

Neither invented their technology but both executed strategy to push through barriers others couldn’t. When you consider the cumulative impact of 1.5 billion smart phones now in circulation, only  20 per cent of them are iPhones.

Ford had near 50 per cent of the American car market at times in the Roaring ’20s. Jobs proved we’d pay double for a smart white mistress – if she looked cool and performed to his expectations.

My point or question is who’s toys or tools have given us more freedom? Jobs or Ford? Or can Richard Branson audacity with public space flights find a mass market model?

Let’s not yet cringe at a smart phone’s intelligence even if we’ve succumbed on mass as her robot mistress. Are these our future tools of freedom or will they become chains of increasing platonic bondage?

This revolution of inter-connectivity opens portals to new friends and prospects everyday but challenges our most precious commodities – time and head space.

The smart phone is a stunning tool in personal reinvention. There’s also a good case for us to slow down more regularly, to ditch the mistress from a dirty weekend.

Google are slowly unleashing it’s goggles, I mean glasses, on us.Then onwards to the Google self-drive car potentially our first productive time-recovery tool in a while.

At the expense dropping to third in the pecking order inside our own transport behind the car itself and mistress of directions. Early adopters handing over the car keys to a Google-wagon will surely be nervy?

We’ll surely be smirk at our first at jaywalking Google goggled virgin? Will Richard Branson release  competing eye wear with mini afterburner arms and a free Flying V skateboard?

Will he risk his hair at a self-propelled publicity launch before rocketing into sub-orbit on his own rocket challenger?

The questions are endless? Will safety statistics tell us if more people or lamp posts are damaged by collisions with free-spirited cars or disoriented googlers, head-down smart phone users or goggling Virgin skate rocketeers?

Power for humans is intoxicating be it knowledge, curiosity, love or self- fulfillment. Losing power or control over deep thinking time is where personal growth suffers in leadership ranks.

Reflect on your time-in-motion? How many humans have increased their share of your undivided attention since you went smart phone?

We communicate with expanded social networks on line but do you have more coffees with your laptop, phone or life partner these days?

But every past market had a bell curve. That point of diminishing personal returns.

Everyone’s time is finite, yet the on line competition for attention keeps growing.

We have the power to change it for ourselves – if we dare. Will your next mistress be called FOMO or is that what she will be calling you?

Ford vs iPhone table

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